pure, kindly, and radiant hearts (take 4)

Today’s lesson: pure, kindly and radiant hearts.

December 30, 2018: 5 children, aged 5–8. We got together for a reprise of our lesson on having a pure, kindly, and radiant heart. We decided to revisit the same topic several weeks in a row, as we’ve done in the past; for the moment, we’re aiming for three weeks on each topic, and we’ll see how well that’s received. One child who attended the last session was missing this week, but we had two new children show up, bringing us to five.

The lesson plan for this week was roughly the same as last week’s, but with a few changes and additions. First, we started the class with colouring, rather than just colouring at the end; we coloured little pictures that we used in memorizing the quote, in the same way as we used pictures to make a rebus last time. Instead of erasing the words and drawing pictures on the board, though, we placed each coloured picture on top of the words that they replaced.

Next, although we used the same coffee-cup activity as last time—dropping a little bit of coffee into a cup to represent unkind actions and washing it out with water to represent kind actions—we refined it a little. Instead of pouring the coffee from one cup to the other willy-nilly, we used an eyedropper to add the coffee little by little. That way, we had the children consider the effects of just one unkind act—right away, they could see that the water in the cup was impure, and that it took them a lot of water (i.e., a lot of acts of kindness) to restore the cup to its original purity.

This week, we played a game where we had to pass a ball around without our hands, using a piece of paper instead. It was a little challenging at first, but once the children figured out how to hold the paper properly in order to hold the ball, it was a lot easier. Interestingly, we found that the game “The Burning Thirst” wasn’t really working out for us. I suspect it’s because we weren’t playing it as intended, but to be honest, I don’t know if we’ve ever played it as intended. To the children’s class teachers reading this: What’s your experience been like? Have the kids in your class enjoyed “The Burning Thirst” as a fun game? How do you approach it? Do you play it outside or inside? If inside, how do you prepare the space? Do the kids end up playing and getting wet, or are they too worried about making a mess to really enjoy it?

Anyway, we ended off the class with the colouring page for this lesson from Ruhi Book 3. To tie it in with the lesson, we explained that perhaps one of the girls in the picture had done something unkind, and, realizing what she had done, decided that she should apologize by doing something kind to make up for it. So, she gathered up a bunch of colourful flowers and gave them to her friends. And speaking of stories, I almost forgot—we told the story of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá from the lesson this week, too, where ‘Abdu’l-Bahá filled up the lady’s cup with pure water. (The children were pretty impressed.)

So, apart from “The Burning Thirst”, the lesson was well-received again this week, and our newcomers seemed really happy to attend. I’m not sure if we’ll have more kids again next week, but we have other things in the words that will lead to more families getting involved in activities. More on that later!

pure, kindly, and radiant hearts (take 3)

Today’s lesson: pure, kindly and radiant hearts.

December 16, 2018: 4 children, aged 5–10. It’s been a while since our last update! I’ll post a little something to tell the story of what we’ve been up to lately, but first, a class report about the first gathering of our new children’s class, using Grade 1 of the Ruhi Book 3 curriculum.

We started the class with a mix of four children: Two five-year-olds, one nine-year-old and one ten-year-old. One of the five-year-olds is from a Bahá’í family, and the rest are his friends, who we invited after speaking to their parents to explain the nature of the class. At the beginning of class, we took a few moments to explain about the expected atmosphere, and asked the children to think of some rules for us to observe during the class. We settled on the following five rules, which we felt made for a good start:

  • Listen to the teacher
  • Keep ourselves and the classroom clean
  • Sit quietly and reverently during prayers
  • No chatting/side conversations during class
  • One person speaks at a time

Next, we said a few words about prayer. We explained that when praying, we were conversing with God. We might pray for someone to get better when they’re sick, we explained, or we might pray for good results on our schoolwork, or for any number of things. The children were familiar with certain forms of prayer—all of them had visited a pagoda before, or worshipped at the family altars that are so ubiquitous in Vietnam—so it wasn’t a big stretch for them to understand. Following that, we invited the children to say prayers. The child from the Bahá’í family said a Bahá’í prayer he had learned, and one of the others said a Buddhist prayer she had learned. Afterwards, we started memorizing the prayer, “O God! Guide me…”. After writing it on the board, we recited it word by word. Then, we began erasing some of the words and replacing them with pictures, making a sort of rebus.

Once we were done going through the prayer, we wrote the quotation down on the board, looking at the words “pure”, “kindly”, “radiant”, and “heart”, and explaining what they mean together. To illustrate, we launched into an experiment: Taking some thick, black Vietnamese coffee, a cup, a pitcher of water, and a wash basin, we showed what happens when we act unkindly by pouring the coffee into the cup: We get a dark, gloomy, and radiant heart. To improve the situation, we added water, representing acts of kindness. The more water (kindness) we poured in, the clearer the contents of the cup became, until finally, we had a clear and radiant cup (heart) once more. Each of the children had a turn pouring water into the cup until all of the coffee was gone (overflowing into the wash basin).

We finished the class with some time to draw, asking each of the children to draw something that they read about in the prayer or the quotation. For example, one drew a brilliant star; another drew an umbrella (for “protect me”, as in, protect me from the rain)… We also wanted to play the game “The Burning Thirst”, but we ran out of time, and so we played it after some of the kids had started to leave.

All in all, it was a great class. The children loved it, and some of the parents told us that the message had an impact—they caught their kids saying “don’t do that, you don’t want to have a dark and gloomy heart!” After this positive start, we’re thinking that we should be able to invite more kids for the next round, perhaps even doubling the size of the class. Stay tuned!

tiếng việt

Chúng tôi ?ã phát tri?n các v?t li?u sau ?ây cho các l?p h?c c?a con cái c?a chúng tôi trong nh?ng n?m qua; b?n có th? tìm th?y m?t s? trong s? h? ch? h?u ích khi h? ?ang có, ho?c h? có th? giúp truy?n c?m h?ng cho b?n ?? t?o ra v?t li?u c?a riêng b?n v? các ch? ?? khác nhau.

B?n có tài li?u mà b?n mu?n chia s? v?i chúng ta và th? gi?i? Hãy liên l?c v?i chúng tôi!

español

Hemos desarrollado los siguientes materiales para las clases de nuestros propios hijos en los últimos años; es posible encontrar algunos de ellos útiles tal y como son, o pueden ayudarle a inspirar para crear sus propios materiales sobre diferentes temas.

¿Tiene materiales que le gustaría compartir con nosotros y el mundo? Póngase en contacto con nosotros!

 

Hojas de lección
Páginas para colorear
Ejercicios escritos/dibujados

français

Nous avons développé les matériaux suivants pour nos classes d’enfants au fil des années; peut-être vous les trouverez utiles comme tels, ou bien ils vous inspireront à créer vos propres matériaux sur des thèmes différents.

Avez-vous créé des matériaux que vous aimeriez partager avec nous et le monde? Entrez en contact avec nous!

Matériaux informatifs
Feuillets de leçon
Pages à colorier
Exercices écrits et dessinés
Labyrinthes
Mots cachés
Autres

god, our true friend (take 2)

Today’s lesson: god is our true friend.

June 29, 2013: 5 children, aged 6–11. Today was our second class on the topic of being a true friend, taken from Lesson 13 of Ruhi Book 3, Grade 2, Set 5. Since we had told the story of the prisoners in the Siyáh-Chál last week, we planned to continue this week with the dramatic exercise, which was for the children to practice telling the story on their own. After we were done with the memorization and introduced the activity, though, the children unanimously told us they wanted to draw and colour. What could we do? We had a few extra colouring sheets, so we let them go ahead. We took the opportunity to go over the story again, since several of them were using the same colouring sheet as last time, which showed the Shah peering into the sky, listening to the heavenly chanting as it echoed from the depths of the dungeon. We had a great time and a great conversation—which shows, I suppose, that although things don’t always go the way you’d like, there’s usually a way or two to make the best of the situation.