tiếng việt

Chúng tôi đã phát triển các vật liệu sau đây cho các lớp học của con cái của chúng tôi trong những năm qua; bạn có thể tìm thấy một số trong số họ chỉ hữu ích khi họ đang có, hoặc họ có thể giúp truyền cảm hứng cho bạn để tạo ra vật liệu của riêng bạn về các chủ đề khác nhau.

Bạn có tài liệu mà bạn muốn chia sẻ với chúng ta và thế giới? Hãy liên lạc với chúng tôi!


Hemos desarrollado los siguientes materiales para las clases de nuestros propios hijos en los últimos años; es posible encontrar algunos de ellos útiles tal y como son, o pueden ayudarle a inspirar para crear sus propios materiales sobre diferentes temas.

¿Tiene materiales que le gustaría compartir con nosotros y el mundo? Póngase en contacto con nosotros!


Hojas de lección
Páginas para colorear
Ejercicios escritos/dibujados


Nous avons développé les matériaux suivants pour nos classes d’enfants au fil des années; peut-être vous les trouverez utiles comme tels, ou bien ils vous inspireront à créer vos propres matériaux sur des thèmes différents.

Avez-vous créé des matériaux que vous aimeriez partager avec nous et le monde? Entrez en contact avec nous!

Matériaux informatifs
Feuillets de leçon
Pages à colorier
Exercices écrits et dessinés
Mots cachés

god, our true friend (take 2)

Today’s lesson: god is our true friend.

June 29, 2013: 5 children, aged 6–11. Today was our second class on the topic of being a true friend, taken from Lesson 13 of Ruhi Book 3, Grade 2, Set 5. Since we had told the story of the prisoners in the Siyáh-Chál last week, we planned to continue this week with the dramatic exercise, which was for the children to practice telling the story on their own. After we were done with the memorization and introduced the activity, though, the children unanimously told us they wanted to draw and colour. What could we do? We had a few extra colouring sheets, so we let them go ahead. We took the opportunity to go over the story again, since several of them were using the same colouring sheet as last time, which showed the Shah peering into the sky, listening to the heavenly chanting as it echoed from the depths of the dungeon. We had a great time and a great conversation—which shows, I suppose, that although things don’t always go the way you’d like, there’s usually a way or two to make the best of the situation.

cooperation and reciprocity (take 4)

Today’s lesson: cooperation and reciprocity.

June 15, 2013: 5 children, 7–10 years old. For the past little while (starting this winter, in fact), our junior youth have been planning a service project: come to the children’s class and serve hot chocolate and cookies to their younger siblings and cousins. Everything finally worked out this week, and they were able to follow through. The children loved it, of course—who would turn down hot chocolate and cookies? It also gave us the opportunity to discuss the qualities we show when serving, and reinforced our lesson about the need for cooperation and reciprocity—when we all serve together, everyone benefits. Unfortunately, the junior youth were so busy with other activities (football matches, family visits, and so on) that they couldn’t stay for long, but it was nice that they were finally able to put their plans to serve into action. We learned a good lesson, too: when you make plans, whether in a children’s class or in a junior youth group, make sure that you act on them sooner rather than later, in order to avoid losing the enthusiasm to serve, which could lead to discouragement. (Not to mention the fact that we had expected to be serving hot chocolate in February, not June.)

father's day artTo finish off the class, we printed out colouring pages for Father’s Day, for the children to colour and give to their fathers. I got one, too, signed by all of them, since our own baby boy will be coming soon. (Quynh got a mother’s day card last month, too.) They’re all very excited to meet the baby; they spent a while during last week’s class thinking up and writing down names. Most of the names seem to come from boy bands and other celebrities, like Justin, Harry, Niall, Liam, Zack, Cody, and so on. Some were a little more unusual, like “Toutou” for example. This week, we challenged them to come up with some really unusual (even crazy) names, and they obliged, serving up gems such as Kratos, Tim Horton, Muscle, Goomba, Scorpion King, Benkie Barn, Crustino Ronundio, Spirit Bomb, Special Beam Cannon, Lightning Tsunami, President Of The United States, The Strongest Zeus In The World, and—probably my favourite—The Best In The World Is The Boy Who Love His Father. We shared some good laughs, and revelled in the children’s creativity. (I hope they won’t be disappointed if we choose more commonplace names!)

“for the love of my beauty”

Today’s lesson: “for the love of my beauty”.

November 14, 2012: The class went well, although we focused mainly on memorizing the prayer and quote rather than the story and other activities. Since several children were showing signs of wanting to let out pent-up energy as we approached the house, running, jumping and screaming, we spent a little time at the outset playing some circle games, such as our usual name game (say your name and associate it with an action) and Tap Hands. Then we continued with the Unity Prayer, asked them about their understanding of unity, and then continued on to learn the quote, identifying difficult words. We had started late and had already spent much of the beginning of class on games, so we skipped straight ahead to our art activity—blow painting, with another brief game as we stepped aside to prepare the paint. We prepared six cups with diluted acrylic paint—red, orange, yellow, green, blue and purple—along with a bunch of straws and coloured paper. We showed the children how to pick up the diluted paint with the straw—just cover the top of it with your finger—and asked them to drop bits of paint onto their paper, and then blow it around with the straw. The result was quite impressive!

blow painting

And fun to make!

The point of the exercise, of course, was to produce a backing for the prayer we had read—copies of which I had printed out before coming. Of course, some of the children put so much paint on their papers that they couldn’t stick the prayer on right afterwards, and had to wait a while before trying again. That just shows that we really need to practice these kinds of projects at home before bringing them to the class, so we have a good idea of how to do them properly. (I’m reminded of the time I tried to teach origami without having learned to do it myself beforehand.) All in all though, this was a fun class, but I’m worried that because we spent so much time on games this time, we might lack time to finish all the other activities next week. Watch this space, I guess?